Friday, November 23, 2007

Comic Strip Gag Writing: Idea Rejections

PC & Pixel by Tak Bui

Here's a timely comic strip gag that I recently wrote for PC and Pixel by Tak Bui. This one is dedicated to anyone who has ever submitted an idea, only to be flat-out rejected ... Enjoy!


November 16, 2007

You can read PC and Pixel daily at United Media's Comics.com.

Stay TOONed!

- Mike Cope

Friday, November 16, 2007

My Comic Strip Syndicate Submission - CONTEST: “Be the Teacher ... Win a Prize!”

My Comic Strip Syndicate Submission by Mike Cope - CONTEST: Be the Teacher ... Win a Prize!

Okay, I’ll admit it ... Prizes are one of the oldest “teacher tricks” in the book! But now that I have your attention ...

As you may already know, I’ve mailed a submission to the comic strip syndicates. You see, my childhood dream has always been to draw a daily strip, like the ones published in newspapers.

I’ve written more about this in PARTS 1, 2, and 3.

While I certainly hope that the syndicates enjoy my submission, another very important group of people in the funnies business is the readers. I'm curious to know what you think about my new comic strip, K is for KRICK, and so I’m inviting you to:

BE THE TEACHER ...

Yup! I’m inviting you to take on the role of a teacher and help “evaluate” my new comic strip, K is for KRICK.

As a token of appreciation, I’ll give you the chance to:

... WIN A PRIZE!

Are you interested? Here's what to do ...

  1. Review my samples of K is for KRICK.
  2. Type your evaluation.
  3. Email it to me privately or Post it as a blog comment.

Submit your evaluation before the deadline below, and you'll be entered in the draw ... It’s that easy!

K is for KRICK - Click Here to View Samples!



FULL CONTEST DETAILS:


(1) WHO CAN PARTICIPATE:

Pretty much anyone, so long as it’s legal for you to read comic strips in your country (unfortunately, I’m serious).

The good news is that you needn’t be a cartoonist or a teacher, but you’re most especially welcome if you are! It doesn’t matter if you’re young or old either. My only suggestion is that you feel young at heart ... like Krick!

That said, young children should always be supervised by a responsible adult while they are “surfing” the Internet.


(2) HOW TO PARTICIPATE:

It’s easy! Review my samples of K is for KRICK and then send me a written “evaluation.” Essentially, I’d like to know what you think of my new comic strip, be it positive or negative.

For example:

  • What was your favourite (or least favourite) strip?
  • What do you think of the drawing/writing?
  • In your opinion, what is working well? What could benefit from some improvement?
  • Would you like to read more K is for KRICK?

Your evaluation can be as in-depth as you’d like. I’ll be happy to review any feedback you offer about my new comic strip.


(3) WHERE TO SEND YOUR EVALUATION:

You can either send me your evaluation privately via e-mail, or share it publicly as a comment on my blog.

To Send Privately:
Please use the e-mail address found on My Contact Page.

To Share Publicly:
If you would like to share your evaluation with others, please feel free to use the “POST A COMMENT” link found at the bottom of my comic strip samples posting. Please note that I will not delete any negative evaluations posted unless they are derogatory or deemed inappropriate for any other reason. Any public comments are otherwise welcome for they can promote discussion and learning for other aspiring cartoonists.

Special Note:
I will require a valid e-mail address where I can contact you if you WIN A PRIZE, so if you share your evaluation publicly, but would prefer to send me your e-mail address privately, please feel free to do so. If you’re not worried about winning a prize, then I do not require your e-mail address.


(4) DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS:

Feedback is welcome at anytime, however, in order to receive the chance to WIN A PRIZE, I must receive your evaluation no later than:

Sunday, December 16, 2007
11:59PM EST

I will contact prize winners the following morning via e-mail.


(5) PRIZE(s) INFORMATION:

Yup! There’s more than one prize to be won!

Unfortunately, I can NOT offer you 65 inch, LCD flat screen, Full HD TV with 500 Watt surround sound and installation ... unless you buy it for me first!

However, I CAN offer FIVE randomly selected participants their choice of any ONE of the following:

  • An original KRICK pencil sketch.
  • A black & white KRICK daily comic strip print.
  • A full-colour KRICK Sunday comic strip print.
  • A full-colour gag cartoon print (see samples).

All prizes will be signed and can be personalized to anyone you would like. Prints can be any of my cartoons of your choice.

More information will be provided to the winners, but if you have any questions, please feel free to e-mail me using the address on my contact page.

END OF CONTEST DETAILS

###




K is for KRICK - Principal Grace (Close-up)

A FINAL THOUGHT & THANKS ...

It’s not easy being a teacher -- especially when it comes to assessment and evaluation! On one hand, you have the sweet little angels who never cause trouble and always do their work, so it’s tempting to just give them an A or B without ever really looking at their assignments. Then there are those little devils, and one word comes to mind: REVENGE!

I’ll admit it, I wasn’t always an angel ... I once bit a classmate.

It’s true!

Okay, so we were in Kindergarten.

But no matter the joy/grief that a student offers, an “ideal” teacher is an impartial judge/jury of their learning. As such, the most valuable evaluation that a teacher can give a student is not a number or single letter ... It’s a comment.

Thanks for your comments ... and GOOD LUCK!

- Mike Cope

My Comic Strip Syndicate Submission - PART 4: “K is for KRICK"

My Comic Strip Syndicate Submission by Mike Cope - PART FOUR: K is for KRICK

First, a kind thanks to everyone who has taken time to visit the introductory posts to My Comic Strip Syndication Submission. I’d especially like to thank those who wrote to say they looked forward to seeing the samples of K is for KRICK.

If you're interested in reading any of my previous posts, I've added a menu to the right-hand column of this blog.

As for today's topic, I think the following cartoon of Principal Grace says it all ...

K is for KRICK: Principal Grace - Attention Class
K is for KRICK - Principal Grace: "Attention Class.."

Yup, all of my comic strip samples are below! These are copies of the exact same pages that I mailed to the syndicates, whose replies I am currently awaiting (see PART 1).

Right now ... I just hope that I don’t disappoint you.

In fact, I’m a little nervous because there’s no turning back after this. For example, aspiring cartoonists will be able to study all of the strengths and weaknesses of my samples, and then make their own syndicate submissions even better. Still, the teacher in me likes to hope that others may learn from this experience.

Besides, my submissions are already well on their way to the syndicates, so the real damage is already done!

Which reminds me ... I wonder if any of the syndicate editors will notice that spelling mistake on the last page? (*sigh*) I sure hope there aren’t any others! Oh well, I guess that’s what you get for hand-lettering and not using a dictionary ...

K is for KRICK - Pencil Sketch of Krick
K is for KRICK - Pencil Sketch of Krick

Are you still reading this?

Wow! By now, I figured that you would’ve jumped right to the samples of my comic strip. Who wants to listen to a cartoonist fret about all of the things that they should’ve done, would’ve done, or could’ve done ... ?

But seriously, I am happy to share the following samples with you, and I certainly hope that you enjoy them. For as one of my cartooning heroes, Charles M. Schulz, once said:

“If a comic strip isn’t published, then what good is it? Unless you just want to hang it on the wall or something ...” (SOURCE: The Comics Journal Audio Archive)

While I certainly hope that the syndicates enjoy my submission, another very important group of people in the funnies business is the readers. I'm curious to know what you think about my new comic strip, and so I welcome any feedback that you would like to offer. I know that my comic strip will not appeal to all readers, but if you’d like to share your thoughts, full details on how to submit your feedback can be found here.

Without further ado, I present to you the samples of my comic strip syndicate submission: K is for KRICK!

K is for KRICK by Mike Cope

K is for KRICK by Mike Cope: Syndicate Sample Page 01 K is for KRICK by Mike Cope: Syndicate Sample Page 02

K is for KRICK by Mike Cope: Syndicate Sample Page 03 K is for KRICK by Mike Cope: Syndicate Sample Page 04

K is for KRICK by Mike Cope: Syndicate Sample Page 05

K is for KRICK by Mike Cope: Syndicate Sample Page 06 K is for KRICK by Mike Cope: Syndicate Sample Page 07

K is for KRICK by Mike Cope: Syndicate Sample Page 08

K is for KRICK by Mike Cope: Syndicate Sample Page 09 K is for KRICK by Mike Cope: Syndicate Sample Page 10

K is for KRICK by Mike Cope: Syndicate Sample Page 11
K is for KRICK by Mike Cope - Comic Strip Syndicate Submission Samples

Well, that concludes the samples, so I hope you've enjoyed this "sneak peak" at my comic strip syndicate submission. As I've previously mentioned, I'd be more than happy to find out what you think (be it positive or negative) about K is for Krick.

For full details on how to submit your feedback (and be given the chance to WIN A PRIZE) click on the following graphic ...

K is for KRICK - Be the Teacher Contest!
K is for KRICK - Be the Teacher Contest!

To learn a little more about K is for KRICK as well as the comic strip syndicate submission process, please visit the links located along the right-hand column of this blog, or select a topic:

PART 1: "You're Invited ..."
PART 2: "Guidelines, Tips & Advice"
PART 3: "Writing a Cover Letter"

Thanks again for your interest in my work.

Stay TOONed!

- Mike Cope

Thursday, November 15, 2007

My Comic Strip Syndicate Submission - PART 3: “Writing a Cover Letter"

My Comic Strip Syndicate Submission by Mike Cope - PART THREE: Writing a Cover Letter

If you’re just joining in, I revealed in my previous post that the title of my new comic strip is K is for KRICK, and that Krick is a schoolteacher. Technically, he’s a substitute teacher in my syndicate submission; nevertheless, he’s a fully-trained and certified high school science teacher!

Fresh out of teachers college, he’s currently on an adventure to find a full-time teaching position. This can be a lot like fishing. You toss your application into the vast ocean, and then hope that you’ll get a nibble or two.

Part of the excitement (and stress) is that you never "reel-ee" know what you’ll reel in ... if anything.

It’s sorta like submitting to the comic strip syndicates ...

K is for KRICK: Cap'n Rod
K is for KRICK: "Cap'n Rod will help yee catch one!"

Now that I’ve set the stage, let’s try a bit of role-playing!

Imagine you’re a cartoonist ... This may be easier for some to do than others. For those who aren’t sure, you can dress casually, but showering is still preferred. Glasses are optional, although I think most of us require corrective eyewear of some sort -- daily eyestrain is an occupational hazard.

If you’re worried that you don’t know how to draw, that’s okay, I feel the same way at times. For now, we’re both cartoonists!

So ... what are you working on?

Interesting.

Me? I’m trying to write a cover letter.

Yeah, I know ... it's not a cartoon, but I’ve been preparing this submission for the comic strip syndicates and have carefully studied their different submission guidelines as described in PART 2. I’ve completed a minimum of 4 week’s worth of sample strips, and have neatly printed them on standard 8 ½” x 11” sheets of paper, but ...

I just don’t know what I should say to the syndicate editors. I want to say something that will really sell my comic strip ...

Shouldn't the samples should speak for themselves?

Hmm ... Good point.

But what about telling the editors about who my characters are, or what the strip is all about? Don't you think --

Peanuts?

No, I never read any of those things before I read Peanuts for the first time ... I just read Mr. Schulz’s strips.

Still, shouldn’t I (at least) say hello? I mean, this is the first page that the editor will see when they open my submission. That is, provided the mailperson doesn’t accidentally drop it in a puddle of mucky water, turning it into nothing but a weathered pile of goo ... (*sigh*) ...

Yeah, I’m worried about that too ...

After all, the syndicates receive thousands of submissions per year! In a recent Comics Coast to Coast podcast with syndicate editor, Amy Lago, it was said that some cartoonists mail their comic strip samples in big heavy binders ... I figure it’s only a matter of time before the letter carrier who needs to deliver my business-sized envelope gets tired!

Besides, drawing a syndicated comic strip was my childhood dream. The last thing I want to get is another one of these ...

Form Rejection - King Features Syndicate

These ...

Form Rejection - United Media / United Feature Syndicate

Or these ...

Form Rejection - Universal Press Syndicate

I dunno ... I guess I just want to do the right thing.

In fact, Krick feels the same way ...

K is for KRICK: Principal Grace
K is for KRICK: "Not exactly, Principal Grace ..."

As you’ll see in the K is for KRICK comic strip samples that I'll be sharing tomorrow, Krick feels a little like a fish out of water at the school where he is supply teaching. I think that a lot of new teachers feel that way sometimes ... err ... a lot of times!

I feel the same way about writing this cover letter.

Huh? What about his tie?

Oh, I like drawing Krick wearing a tie so he looks professional, but what does that have to do with writing this cover ... Say, that’s a good idea ... Just be professional.

Thanks for the advice!

(*ahem*)

Dear Syndicate Editor,

I am sincerely honoured to present to you my new comic strip ...

[delete][delete][delete]

Dear Syndicate Editor,

How’s the weather today in Florida, Kansas, California, New York, Toronto?

[delete][delete]

Dear Syndicate Editor,

I hope you don’t send me a form rejection letter like last time.

[delete]

This is my childhood dream ... Please don’t make me cry.

[...]

Are you really reading this? My comic strip samples are on the next page ...

[...]

Dear Syndicate Editor,

I hope you enjoy my comic strip.

(*scratch*)(*scratch*)

... enough that you don't mail me a form rejection letter!

(*sigh*)

K is for KRICK: Teacher's Sense
K is for KRICK: "That's your Teacher's Sense that's tinggling ..."

I hope that you've enjoyed this little introduction to My Comic Strip Syndicate Submission ... Tomorrow, I'll be sharing all the samples of my new comic strip, K is for KRICK, and will also be offering you the chance to WIN A PRIZE!

'Til then ...

Stay TOONed!

- Mike Cope

Wednesday, November 14, 2007

My Comic Strip Syndicate Submission - PART 2: “Guidelines, Tips & Advice"

My Comic Strip Syndicate Submission by Mike Cope - PART TWO: Guidelines, Tips & Advice

As announced in PART 1, I’ve mailed a comic strip submission to the major syndicates for consideration. While I wait for their replies, I’m inviting readers to join me in this pursuit of my childhood dream. As a token of appreciation, I hinted that you’ll be given the chance to WIN A PRIZE! Full details about this “fun” contest can be found here.

Today, I’m going to highlight a little about comic strip syndicate submission guidelines. I’m writing this with the general reader in mind, so I apologize to any cartoonists who are already familiar with the submission process. For aspiring cartoonists, I’m also including a few tips and advice from the pros.

But first, here’s a closer look at the comic strip that I showed in yesterday’s teaser photo ...

KRICK: From Pencil to Ink
KRICK: "From Pencil to Ink"

Later in this post, you’ll find out why Krick doesn’t feel so good! Which reminds me, have you guessed what Krick’s occupation might be? I gave a few hints in PART 1. If you think you know the answer, you’ll find out if you’re right at the end of this posting ... You’ll also learn the title of my new comic strip!

For now, let’s take a close-up look at what the syndicates are looking for in a comic strip submission ...

K is for KRICK - Principal Grace (Close-up)

Submission Guidelines:

At the time of this writing, the specific submission guidelines for the “major” comic strip syndicates can be found by clicking the following links:

Creator’s Syndicate
King Features Syndicate
Tribune Media Services
United Media / United Feature Syndicate
Universal Press Syndicate
The Washington Post Writers Group

TorStar Syndication Services

As mentioned in PART 1, TorStar is the only major syndicate based in Canada. The rest are all in the United States.

"What we are looking for ..."

If you visit the above links, you may notice that (aside from the number of samples to include) some syndicates don’t give any details as to what they’re looking for in a comic strip. I think that this is a good thing because it requires the cartoonist to use their own imagination. After all, even though comic strips are sold as commercial products, they start as a personal expression.

Still, if you’re an aspiring cartoonist, here are a few items that all editors expect in a comic strip submission (courtesy of King Features, Universal Press, and United Feature):

  • an individual slant on the world and humour
  • events/characters that other people can relate to
  • drawn clear with visual impact
  • legible enough to reduce to newspaper size
  • a high level of quality
  • consistency

Most of these points speak for themselves, but here’s one that can never be stressed enough:

“Good writing helps weak art, better than good art helps weak writing.”

Although it’s usually the drawings that first attract a reader’s attention, it’s the writing that keeps them coming back. Even a comic strip with no dialogue has element of writing. After all, the funnies are a form of visual storytelling.

I must admit that this is something that wasn’t always clear to me. In fact, I’m still learning something new every day, so I feel that I should add the disclaimer that I’m writing this from the perspective of someone currently seeking syndication. In other words: Don’t take what I’m writing as “expert” advice!

That said, some of the best advice that I’ve ever heard has come directly from syndicated cartoonists whom I’ve been lucky to meet either in person or via online forums such as ToonTalk and The Wisenheimer. When it comes to good writing, here are two important tips from the pros:

Write what you know.
Write from your heart.

With that in mind, I’m happy to share with you the title of my new comic strip ...

K is for KRICK by Mike Cope
K is for KRICK by Mike Cope

As you might have guessed, Krick is a schoolteacher! The basic premise of the strip was inspired by my own experiences as both a new teacher (“write what you know”) and a young husband (“write from your heart”). Of course, I’ve exaggerated the truth just a little in the spirit of the funnies ...

K is for KRICK: Comic Strip Sample
K is for KRICK - Sample Comic Strip

For my syndicate submission, Krick is technically a substitute teacher. Still, he’s a fully-trained and certified high school science teacher, freshly graduated from teacher’s college and jumping through all the hoops that one does as a rookie ...

Like being sent back to elementary school?

Come back and find out!

Tomorrow, I'll share some more about K is for KRICK and will touch on the comic strip syndication submission topic of Writing a Cover Letter. And be sure to stop by anytime after Friday for your chance to WIN A PRIZE!

Stay TOONed!

- Mike Cope

Tuesday, November 13, 2007

My Comic Strip Syndicate Submission - Q&A: “Childhood Dream?”

My Comic Strip Syndicate Submission by Mike Cope - Q&A Session: Childhood Dream?

Last night, I received an interesting question from someone who read my previous post, asking why it’s taken me over 5 years to send a new submission to the syndicates when I described comic strip syndication as my “childhood dream.”

The short answer is: “Because I wasn’t ready.”

Since you're still reading this, I'm guessing it's because you'd like to know a little more about the long answer. For that, let's travel a few years back in time ... (cue Doctor Who music) ...

"Dear Contributor:"

After receiving nothing but form rejections (i.e., photocopied ‘no thank you’ letters) from all of the different syndicates back in 2001 and 2002, I decided that I needed to let my cartooning and writing skills develop more before I bothered the syndicate editors again. I was honestly worried about being seen as more of a nuisance than someone seeking a professional contract.

Of course, form rejections are an undesirable, but necessary part of the business. As mentioned in PART ONE, the syndicates receive thousands of submissions per year, so it’s impossible for their editors to personally reply to every cartoonist.

The following are a few examples of form rejection letters that I previously received from King Features, United Feature, and Universal Press Syndicate. Of special note is the one in the top left -- even though it's just a form rejection, it was hand-signed in pen by the late Jay Kennedy ...

Form Rejection - King Features SyndicateForm Rejection - United Media / United Feature SyndicateForm Rejection - Universal Press Syndicate

Sample Form Rejection Letters from Comic Strip Syndicates (circa 2001).

Since drawing a syndicated comic strip has always been my childhood dream, I didn’t want to annoy the editors with more and more submissions if I wasn’t improving. Besides, I’d only be collecting more and more rejection forms, so I had to think about my impact on the environment too! And so, I continued with my school studies, which included taking some art classes, but I also let myself grow up a little (cartoonists prefer to describe this as “gaining life experiences” ... if you're familiar with Peter Pan, you'll understand why).

Looking back, it's interesting to see how one step has led to the next ... Hopefully, I've been heading in the right direction!

Over the years, I’ve sold my cartoons to a variety of “small” publications. I also drew a weekly strip for my university’s newspaper. For any aspiring cartoonist that might be reading this, these are all great opportunities where one can develop artistically and gain regular clients. Some of my older cartoons now make me cringe (I'm lucky that folks paid to publish them rather than burn them!), but cartooning is no different than anything else ... The more you practice, the better you get.

Just for fun, here's one from "way back" in 1999 ...

BigMAC by Mike Cope - Publishing in the McMaster Silhouette - April 8, 1999)
bigMAC - Published in The Silhouette, McMaster University (April 8, 1999).

I guess the big question is: WHY NOW?

Honestly, it all came down to a gut feeling of "being ready."

Since 2003, I’ve enjoyed the opportunity of being a freelance gagwriter for the daily comic strip PC & Pixel by Tak Bui. This has been a great learning experience with respect to writing specifically for a comic strip. To-date, I've sold over 200 gags. In May 2006, I sold my first cartoon to Reader’s Digest Canada and have had several more published by them since. I'm hoping these are signs that my writing and cartooning are (finally) reaching a new level. Whether or not this level is what any of the syndicates are looking for, I honestly don’t know ... I guess we’ll find out in six to eight (or more) weeks!

On that note, I’d like to conclude by saying that many people count down the years, months, weeks, and days before they can retire. Heck, some even count down the hours of a single work day—I know I’ve done it! Syndicated or not, I don’t intend to ever “retire” from cartooning. As silly as it may sound, a good dream is something that you don’t want to wake up from.

Of course, becoming a syndicated cartoonist is usually easier dreamt than done!

COMING SOON ...

KRICK Teaser Photo: Comic Strip Rough Drawing
KRICK Teaser Photo: "Comic Strip Rough Drawing"

In upcoming posts, I’ll be sharing more about my new comic strip, as well as cover other syndicate submission topics such as: Guidelines, Tips & Advice, Writing a Cover Letter, and more!

I’ll also share more about how you can WIN A PRIZE!

In the meantime, here's a recent blog post written by fellow cartoonist, Geoff Hassing, on the topic of Syndication: The Childhood Dream. As you'll see, for those of us who grew up reading the funnies in their local newspapers, syndication has always been our dream job.

Stay TOONed!

- Mike Cope

Monday, November 12, 2007

My Comic Strip Syndicate Submission - PART 1: “You’re Invited ...”

My Comic Strip Syndicate Submission by Mike Cope

Last week, I did something that I haven’t done in over 5 years ... I mailed a submission to the comic strip syndicates!

What does that mean?

Well, for starters, it means that I now have approximately six to eight weeks (or more) to try to forget about my submission while I “patiently” wait for any syndicate editors to reply. You see, they literally receive thousands of submissions per year, of which only a few are selected for development and/or offered a contract. There’s no guarantee they’ll like my work either.

However, I’ve had plenty of fun drawing this first batch of new cartoons, so my other option is to keep moving forward and continue developing my strip ... Hmm ...

Still reading, eh? I like your enthusiasm!

In fact, you’re more than welcome to join me in this pursuit of my childhood dream ... who knows, you just might WIN A PRIZE for participating!

I know, I know ... that’s one of the oldest “teacher tricks” in the book. But who doesn't like prizes? The best part is, you needn’t be a cartoonist in order to join in the fun. It doesn’t matter if you’re young or old either. My only suggestion is that you feel young at heart! That's right, young at heart, like my new comic strip character, KRICK ...

KRICK by Mike Cope
KRICK: My new comic strip character.

Judging by his pose and outfit, can you guess what KRICK's occupation is? ... Be sure to come back and find out if you're right in the next few days!

In the meantime, let’s cover a few basics about comic strip syndication ...

1) WHO ARE THE SYNDICATES?

The syndicates are the companies that (among other things) handle the distribution of the comic strips which are published in daily newspapers and other media outlets worldwide. In fact, even if you’re only an occasional reader of the funnies, you may recognize some of the syndicate names.

Alphabetically, the “major” U.S. syndicates are:

Creators Syndicate
King Features Syndicate
Tribune Media Services
United Media / United Feature Syndicate
Universal Press Syndicate
The Washington Post Writers Group

Here in Canada, we also have TorStar Syndication Services.

When a cartoonist is described as being “syndicated,” this usually means that they’ve signed a contract with one of the above companies.

2) WHAT'S A SYNDICATION CONTRACT?

A syndication contract is an agreement between a cartoonist and a syndicate. Basically, it defines the legal responsibilities and rights of both parties. You see, a cartoonist may be the creative force behind the writing and drawing of a syndicated comic strip, but it’s the syndicate that handles the important roles of editing, promoting, and selling the cartoonist’s work.

In other words, the syndicates handle the business side of The Funnies Business ... there wouldn't be one without 'em!

3) WHICH SYNDICATES DISTRIBUTE WHICH COMIC STRIPS?

To find out which syndicate(s) your favourite newspaper comic strips are from, look for the tiny text that’s printed alongside any feature ... Sometimes the syndicate’s name appears in the © Copyright. In cases where a cartoonist owns the copyright, you’ll usually see the syndicate’s name associated with the words “Distributed by” (or simply “Dist. by”).

But before you run off to check, here's a li'l teaser ...

KRICK Teaser Photo: Say ... Where's CHARLIE?
KRICK Teaser Photo: "Say ... Where's CHARLIE?"

Starting this week, I intend to share more about the syndicate submission processes, including my own experiences and (most especially) the samples of my new comic strip. There you will find out who Charlie is and where he has gone!

I’ll also invite you, the reader, to offer your own critiques and feedback. As a token of appreciation, you’ll receive the chance to WIN A PRIZE! Of course, I can’t promise you’ll win, just as I can’t promise that I’ll have any luck with my submission, but neither of us will know unless we try :)

Follow me ...
PART 2: "Guidelines, Tips & Advice"
PART 3: "Writing a Cover Letter"

Stay TOONed!

- Mike Cope

P.S. If you’re a cartoonist and are currently working on (or have recently mailed) a syndicate submission, I’d be happy to hear from you. Consider this my shout into the vast void of cyberspace ... IS ANYONE ELSE OUT THERE??